Marketing

Saturday, October 01, 2005

 

With the proliferation of the Internet, the meaning of the word "marketing" has also proliferated. There seem to be as many definitions of marketing as there are marketers. Many see marketing as a series of tactics or gimmicks. Some push pyramid programs [multi-level marketing (MLM) or network marketing] as the way to successful Internet marketing. Others may say the Web has made traditional marketing obsolete. I believe that the Internet has expanded our capabilities, created new ways of doing business, and radically changed business dynamics. It has not, however, changed the basics of what we do.


Basic, traditional marketing is as relevant as ever. The Four P's - product, price, place (distribution), and promotion - are still very much alive. Strategic thinking, segmenting, and targeting can still earn you a competitive advantage. Marketing is still a process of a) determining what our customers need and want, b) planning how we are going to meet those needs and wants, and then c) implementing our plan. We still have products, services, and ideas to sell at some price. We still deliver to our customers via some means of distribution. We still promote and we still advertise. Those are the basics. The basics still exist and always will.


What *has* changed is the business environment. Companies compete with more efficient technologies. Customers have better access to their cost options and they communicate to each other in a way never before possible. In some industries, the Internet has lowered the cost of entry so that entrepreneurs, with little more than a home office, have entered the competition. The changes in competitive environment are numerous.


What have also changed are the specific marketing strategies and the tactics we take to implement those strategies. These have changed, but basic marketing has not. Superior marketing is and always has been analysis, then action. It is strategy development, then logical and thought-out tactical implementation. It is the way to customer satisfaction and increasing profit. It is the process of:


1) Analyzing your customers and the business environment in order to


2) Identify key opportunities to better and more profitably meet customer needs,


3) Figuring out how to act on those opportunities, and then


4) Implementing your plan.


The process doesn't have to be cumbersome. Five-year plans and novel-length documents are not required. The logic of the action is what's important. By applying the basic marketing process both online and offline, your chances of success skyrocket.


Bobette Kyle is author of "How Much For Just the Spider? Strategic Web Site Marketing." She used techniques detailed in the book to bring her own site, WebSiteMarketingPlan.com, from a ranking of 17 million to 59 thousand+ in less than four months. http://www.WebSiteMarketingPlan.com/sr.htm


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Copyright 2002 Bobette Kyle. All rights reserved.





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 February 1 2004--Turbocharger manufacturers see no let up in demand for their products, particularly in Europe. The insatiable demand for turbocharged cars can be attributed to the popularity of direct injected petrol- and diesel-powered cars in both Europe and Japan as well as rising fuel costs. The move toward engine downsizing to improve fuel consumption and lower CO2 emissions has also led to the increasing use of
turbocharging on petrol engines.

The main battleground is Europe, where Garrett dominates the turbocharger market with a 58% share in 2001, followed by BorgWarner with 30% and the two Japanese players, Mitsubishi and IHI with 8% and 4%, respectively. However, competition from the two main Japanese turbo makers, Mitsubishi and IHI, means competition in this market is set to intensify. The players that gain market share through this decade will be those that visualise, accept and adapt to the legislative changes in the market place, further enhancing their product through innovation.

This exclusive report reviews the key market drivers for turbochargers and superchargers for both the passenger car and commercial vehicle markets, providing some forward-looking analysis.

1. Market trends
Analyses product trends and fitment levels for turbochargers in passenger cars and heavy trucks in each major vehicle producing region through 2006, and the total world market for superchargers through 2006. This section of the report also assigns market shares to the main turbocharger producers serving vehicle manufacturers in each regional market. It includes OEM trends and recent announcements as well as a brief analysis of the market trends, threats and opportunities in the supercharger market.

2. Technical review
This section of the report sets out some recent innovations and assesses the forces that are driving those technical advances.

The global market for automotive turbochargers - provides answers to such critical
questions as:
-Which vehicle segments offer the greatest growth potential for turbochargers?
-What will be the fitment level for turbochargers in passenger cars and commercial
vehicles through 2006?
-What will be the total world market for turbochargers in the commercial vehicle
sector through 2006?
-What will be the total world market for superchargers through 2006?
-Which are the leading technologies being developed for next generation turbochargers?
-Are electronically assisted turbochargers too expensive, and unnecessary?

For a complete index of this report click on
ttp://www.researchandmarkets.com/reports/42956

About Research and Markets Ltd.
Research and Markets Ltd. are Europe's largest resource for market research. R&M distribute thousands of major research publications from the world's leading publishers, consultants and market analysts. R&M provide you with the latest forecasts on international and regional markets, key industries, the top companies,
new products and the latest market trends.

For additional information on ResearchandMarkets.com, their range of reports or their value-added services, visit their web site at http://www.researchandmarkets.com or
mailto:press@researchandmarkets.com





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Mostly, advertising is misused and misunderstood. A lot of people confuse "marketing" with "advertising." Advertising is a part of marketing, but not the whole thing! The downside of "misunderstanding" is that small businesses look at this as their only means of getting sales for their business. Many times, the result is miss-spent money with little to show in return.


Advertising can be most effective when you are selling a mass-market product like laundry detergent or coke. However, many small and home owned businesses sell more of a specialized product or services that appeals to a much smaller "niche" market. To understand what can work for you, lets first clear up a few myths about what advertising is:


Myth 1: Advertising is what you have to do to get business. Advertising is simply the purchase of time or space in order to promote a product or service. There are many other marketing methods available such as publicity, promotions, signage and referral programs that could work better for your business.


Myth 2: Advertising is too expensive for small business. It doesn't have to be. You can find very cost effective advertising methods through local community papers, classifieds, "zoning" in your main papers local section (to hit certain zip codes only), industry newsletters and small ads that are placed repeatedly in the same spot of the paper. Cable TV can be targeted and cost-effective as well.


Myth 3: There is only one best advertising method. Just like investing in the stock market, it is important to diversify. You don't want to put all of your eggs into one basket, at least until you find what works best for you. There can be a lot of trial and error, which means that it's crucial to have some type of results mechanism in order to see what works and what doesn't. Sample several approaches all at once, once you have narrowed down the field to those you feel worthy. You will then find the best one or two methods that work for you. This also tells you to avoid any long-term contract with any media outlet until they have been proven a good source. You can even sometimes strike a bargain with a particular media source that you are interested in to allow you to "test" response at a reduced rate.


Myth 4: You only have to advertise on a limited basis. The success of advertising is all about "frequency." It can take up to 5 times before anyone notices your ad, then 10 or more times before they might act on it. Therefore, you have to have enough money in your budget to test the ad over time. Remember that we are exposed to hundreds of ads a day. As a result, we act like "screeners", filtering out any information not useful to us. So, blowing your advertising budget on one 1/2 page ad in your local paper will surely not produce the results you are looking for.


Myth 5: Advertising does all the work for you. You can't place your ad, then sit back and wait for the phones to ring. Advertising is not a passive way to get business. The more active you are in promoting your business through a variety of marketing activities, the more effective your advertising will be. Plus, your promotion activities will greatly enhance your advertising efforts. Most ads produce leads from people that are interested. Therefore, you have to have your follow up messages in place. One of the key factors in this is to have your entire staff be knowledgeable of every ad that is placed, where, when and what their response should be. If someone calls to get more information about your ad, but the person who answers the phone knows little to nothing about it, bang. Dead lead. Have your staff be well prepared to answer all questions.


When a small business should advertise:


*When your target market is reachable by one or more media.


*When your target market is a decent sized mass-market.


*When this is one of the only ways you can reach prospects.


*When you are moving into a new market.


*When your budget permits for frequency.


*When you can reach the most people who can and will buy your product or service through cost effective advertising.


*When your competition does.


*When your competition doesn't.


When a small business should not advertise:


*When it is not cost effective for the return on your investment.


*When your budget will not permit repetition.


*When you expect the adverting will bring in customers by the hundreds.


*When advertising will be your only method of reaching your market.


*When your advertising will be far less than your competition.


*When you cannot afford to have professional ads done.


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Karen E. Hipp, Hipp Marketing
www.downanddirtymarketing.com
Karen@Hippmarketing.com
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 Cape Canaveral, FL May 19, 2004 -- The Auction Report continues to provide vital information to car collectors around the world by adding Ebay auction results and sales percentages.

"Collector Car Auctions are 60% excitement and 40% the Cars". The information The Auction Report provides is quickly becoming an invaluable resource for collectors.

The Ebay results are avaialable via download to paid subscribers only. An annual subscription is $24.95.

Site Highlights
* Site Subscription $24.95
* Up to date auction results across the industry (Currently over 10,000 Transactions for 2003-2004)
* Market Reports
* A clear and concise price guide with real market values
* Free Photo Classifieds
* Free Auction Site
* Resource Directory
* Car Clubs
* Event Calendars
* Industry News
* Technical Information
* A vehicle to exchange ideas, experiences and insight.



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